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  • "No Labels" Deserves A Good Look

    • Posted on Feb 08, 2015


    Former Lieutenant Governor Joy Corning and curent Iowa State Senator Jeff Danielson at the "No Labels" meeting yesterday morning at University Book and Supply in Cedar Falls.  


    Yesterday I spent 90 minutes  listening to  talking with about 25 local citizens who came to hear about “No Labels.”  Thanks to University Book and Supply in Cedar Falls, UNI, and Gerri Perrault,  who hosted the event.  

    Democratic Iowa Senator Jeff Danielson and Republican Lieutenant Governor (former) Joy Corning each spoke and took questions.  They presented their support for “No Labels,” a group that was formed in 2010 in response to our failed congress.  

    Like all of us, they’re frustrated by the utter inability of government to not only not solve current political problems, but to not even discuss them.  As Danielson put it,   “We’re headed for a generation of lost opportunities” which will inevitably create long-term problems for the entire country.  If we do nothing now, nothing will change. That’s big trouble.   

    Current politicians in Washington are behaving like feuding enemies, and continue to be unable to agree on where to begin.  They simply aren’t speaking, as Danielson noted.   

    No Labels ultimate purpose is to encourage politicians to behave more like problem solvers and less like Hatfields and McCoys.  

    Both Corning and Danielson agreed that the current political attitudes, combined with media pressures to sensationalize issues and events, has created a toxic environment for solving problems.  And of course there’s big money flowing in, and with it, big influence.   

    Is there any hope?  

    Danielson made the point that “Iowa was part of No Labels before there was a No Labels,” meaning our state’s political system has always encouraged political 
    compromise to solve the state’s problems.  And until recently, both a Republican and a Democratic Senator.    For the most part, it has worked better here than in other states.  So Danielson expects that Iowans will support No Labels more than most, since we’ve had a divided house and senate for decades. 

    The group has undertaken a process whereby they designate those politicians who agree to become “problem solvers” as “No Labels” and encourages them to generate solutions that may or may not agree with their party’s position.  Good luck with that, eh?  But it’s really the only way, and it’s going to infuriate the ideologues in both parties.  

    By the way, Iowa's Dave Loebsak and Joni Ernst are both designated as No Labels  Problem Solvers.  

    Whether they actually start behaving as problem solvers remains to be seen.   

    “No Labels” has come up with four core goals: 
    (1) 25 million new jobs in the next ten years 
    (2) Make Social Security and Medicare solvent for the next 75 years 
    (3) Make the U.S. energy secure by 2024
    (4) Balance the budget by 2030  (This is not as controversial as it sounds—it mostly means getting the deficit under control.)  

    The No Labels founders believe these four goals to be doable and worthwhile, and will all require intra-party cooperation to become policy and law. 

    So we’ll see.  I’m encouraged that this group even exists, and offers some hope 
    that we might see small movements toward cooperation—if the problem solvers 
    get rewarded by getting elected and by hearing from supportive constituents.  

    I left the meeting feeling at least marginally optimistic, but still sad that it’s come to this: solving problems should not have to be a major goal of an influence group.  It should be standard operating procedure for all political parties.   

    For more information, check out the No Labels website:  www.nolabels.org/  and the Wikipedia entry:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Labels







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  • "No Labels" Deserves A Good Look

    • Posted on Feb 08, 2015


    Former Lieutenant Governor Joy Corning and curent Iowa State Senator Jeff Danielson at the "No Labels" meeting yesterday morning at University Book and Supply in Cedar Falls.  


    Yesterday I spent 90 minutes  listening to and talking with about 25 local citizens who came to hear about “No Labels.”  Thanks to University Book and Supply in Cedar Falls, UNI, and Gerri Perrault,  who hosted the event.  

    Democratic Iowa Senator Jeff Danielson and Republican Lieutenant Governor (former) Joy Corning each spoke and took questions.  They presented their support for “No Labels,” a group that was formed in 2010 in response to our failed congress.  

    Like all of us, they’re frustrated by the utter inability of government to not only not solve current political problems, but to not even discuss them.  As Danielson put it,   “We’re headed for a generation of lost opportunities” which will inevitably create long-term problems for the entire country.  If we do nothing now, nothing will change. That’s big trouble.   

    Current politicians in Washington are behaving like feuding enemies, and continue to be unable to agree on where to begin.  They simply aren’t speaking, as Danielson noted.   

    No Labels ultimate purpose is to encourage politicians to behave more like problem solvers and less like Hatfields and McCoys.  

    Both Corning and Danielson agreed that the current political attitudes, combined with media pressures to sensationalize issues and events, has created a toxic environment for solving problems.  And of course there’s big money flowing in, and with it, big influence.   

    Is there any hope?  

    Danielson made the point that “Iowa was part of No Labels before there was a No Labels,” meaning our state’s political system has always encouraged political 
    compromise to solve the state’s problems.  And until recently, both a Republican and a Democratic Senator.    For the most part, it has worked better here than in other states.  So Danielson expects that Iowans will support No Labels more than most, since we’ve had a divided house and senate for decades. 

    The group has undertaken a process whereby they designate those politicians who agree to become “problem solvers” as “No Labels” and encourages them to generate solutions that may or may not agree with their party’s position.  Good luck with that, eh?  But it’s really the only way, and it’s going to infuriate the ideologues in both parties.  

    By the way, Iowa's Dave Loebsak and Joni Ernst are both designated as No Labels  Problem Solvers.  

    Whether they actually start behaving as problem solvers remains to be seen.   

    “No Labels” has come up with four core goals: 
    (1) 25 million new jobs in the next ten years 
    (2) Make Social Security and Medicare solvent for the next 75 years 
    (3) Make the U.S. energy secure by 2024
    (4) Balance the budget by 2030  (This is not as controversial as it sounds—it mostly means getting the deficit under control.)  

    The No Labels founders believe these four goals to be doable and worthwhile, and will all require intra-party cooperation to become policy and law. 

    So we’ll see.  I’m encouraged that this group even exists, and offers some hope 
    that we might see small movements toward cooperation—if the problem solvers 
    get rewarded by getting elected and by hearing from supportive constituents.  

    I left the meeting feeling at least marginally optimistic, but still sad that it’s come to this: solving problems should not have to be a major goal of an influence group.  It should be standard operating procedure for all political parties.   

    For more information, check out the No Labels website:  www.nolabels.org/  and the Wikipedia entry:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Labels







    Go comment!
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    • Hot Button Issues
    • Conservatives/Liberals
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